Today on the Hill: House Democrats Wrestle With Pelosi Speakership Question

House Democrats are bracing for a contentious battle over the speaker’s gavel. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) — the presumed favorite for the speakership in the 116th Congress — is facing pushback from a host of incumbent and incoming Democrats who say they have the votes to block her path to victory. While both sides jostle for support behind the scenes, a potential challenger to Leader Pelosi has emerged in former Congressional Black Caucus chairwoman Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-OH) who indicated that she would be interested after other members encouraged her to run. The House Democratic caucus is expected to vote on its leadership slate on November 29, with a final vote on the House Floor in January after the new Congress gavels in.

 

Today on the Hill: House GOP Set to Hold Leadership Elections for Next Congress

House Republicans are set to hold leadership elections for the next Congress today. GOP lawmakers are expected to elect Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) to be Minority Leader for the 116th Congress, despite a challenge from Freedom Caucus co-founder Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH). In hopes of quelling an intraparty feud, reports suggest that President Trump has privately urged Rep. McCarthy to cut a deal with Rep. Jordan, fueling speculation that the conservative Ohio lawmaker may be elevated to the top GOP job on the House Judiciary Committee. The Republican Conference is also expected to elect: (1) Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA) as Minority Whip; (2) Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) as Conference Chairwoman; (3) Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN) as National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) Chairman; (4) Rep. Mark Walker (R-NC) as Conference Vice Chairman; and (5) Rep. Jason Smith (R-MO) as Conference Secretary.

 

This Week on the Hill: Congress Returns for ‘Lame-Duck’ Session

House and Senate lawmakers will return to Washington today to begin the “lame duck” session of Congress. As lawmakers seek to clear the seven outstanding appropriations bills, Congress faces a distinct possibility of a post-election showdown over border wall funding. If lawmakers are unable to reach a deal, another continuing resolution (CR) will likely be required to fund the government into early next year. Meanwhile, other items on the lame duck agenda include a farm bill and flood insurance package — both of which are set to expire before the end of the year — along with more targeted action to address issues including criminal justice reform or the Medicare prescription drug “donut hole” reimbursement issue.

 

Health Policy Report

The Week in Review

Voters across the country went to the polls last Tuesday to cast their ballots in an historic midterm election. Riding a wave of unprecedented enthusiasm for a midterm, Democrats regained control of the House of Representatives for the first time since 2010. The 2018 midterms will send one of the largest classes of freshman Members to Washington in recent history — replacing a cadre of centrist, suburban Republicans with largely establishment-backed Democrats that could grow the party’s moderate wing. Meanwhile, an upstart group of unabashedly progressive candidates will be sworn in alongside as many as 15 new members of the GOP’s hardline Freedom Caucus, further fueling a dynamic that has sewn internal fissures into each of the major parties. The 2018 midterms mark the fourth straight midterm election (2006, 2010, 2014, 2018) with at least one chamber of Congress flipping.

 

Today on the Hill: 2018 Midterms Produce Divided Congress

Riding a wave of unprecedented political engagement in a midterm election, Democrats have regained control of the House of Representatives for the first time since 2010. The 2018 midterms will send one of the largest classes of freshman Members to Washington in recent history — replacing a cadre of centrist, suburban Republicans with establishment-backed Democrats that could grow the party’s moderate coalition. Meanwhile, an upstart group of unabashedly progressive candidates will be sworn in alongside as many as 15 new members of the GOP’s hardline Freedom Caucus, further fueling a dynamic that has sewn internal fissures into each of the major parties. The 2018 midterms marks the fourth straight midterm election (2006, 2010, 2014, 2018) with at least one chamber of Congress flipping.

 

Health Policy Report

The Week in Review

House and Senate lawmakers long ago abandoned Washington to hit the campaign trail. Both chambers are scheduled to resume legislative business one week after the midterms on Tuesday, November 13th. While the House’s schedule has yet to be announced, Senators are slated to take up the legislative vehicle (S.140) for Coast Guard reauthorization and consider the nomination of Michelle Bowman to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.

 

Health Policy Report

The Week in Review

House and Senate lawmakers have left Washington to hit the campaign trail.

The Week Ahead

Both chambers are scheduled to resume legislative business one week after the midterms on Tuesday, November 13th. While the House’s schedule has yet to be announced, Senators are slated to take up the legislative vehicle (S.140) for Coast Guard reauthorization and consider the nomination Michelle Bowman to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.

 

Health Policy Report

The Week in Review

House and Senate lawmakers have left Washington to hit the campaign trail.

The Week Ahead

Both chambers are scheduled to resume legislative business one week after the midterms on Tuesday, November 13th. While the House’s schedule has yet to be announced, Senators are slated to take up the legislative vehicle (S.140) for Coast Guard reauthorization and consider the nomination Michelle Bowman to be a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve.

 

Financial Services Report

Much to the delight of Senate staff, a deal was reached last week for the Senate to stand in recess until November 13th.  With the House of Representatives already out of town to campaign this means that this is the last newsletter until after the mid-term elections.

Speaking of the mid-terms we are now three weeks out.   With both the House and Senate out of town, the DC stage has been ceded to the President – and it is likely that he will make active use of it.  How that impacts the elections will be determined on November 6th. 

The current conventional wisdom holds that the House is likely to go Democratic, while the Senate is expected to remain in Republican control.   That will likely change multiple times  – especially because the media has a strong incentive to sell the horse race narrative.    

Whatever the results, rest assured that our bipartisan team at Thorn Run is prepared to help you navigate the next Congress.